Beauty always dies, the manner dies with the matter, the world dies with the individual.

jonasgrossmann:

marcel breuer… rotterdam @ seanrwatson

hipinuff:

El Lissitzky (Russian: 1890-1941), Sketch for Proun 6B, c.1919-21. Pencil and gouache on paper.

hipinuff:

El Lissitzky (Russian: 1890-1941), Sketch for Proun 6B, c.1919-21. Pencil and gouache on paper.

drakontomalloi:

Francisco de Goya - The Repentant St. Peter. 1820-24

drakontomalloi:

Francisco de Goya - The Repentant St. Peter. 1820-24

abstrakshun:

John Golding (British, 1929-2012), Untitled, 1965. Acrylic on canvas, 142.5 x 188 cm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh.

abstrakshun:

John Golding (British, 1929-2012), Untitled, 1965. Acrylic on canvas, 142.5 x 188 cm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh.

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: here’s a gif I put on dribbble.

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: here’s a gif I put on dribbble.

man-of-prose:

"ّI was walking at the graveyard… I read some of the names of the dead people. I was envious of them. I thought, they really are fortunate. I have never felt such jealousy before. I thought that death is a fortune, a blessing that is not attained easily."
—Sadegh Hedayat, Buried Alive

man-of-prose:

"ّI was walking at the graveyard… I read some of the names of the dead people. I was envious of them. I thought, they really are fortunate. I have never felt such jealousy before. I thought that death is a fortune, a blessing that is not attained easily."

Sadegh Hedayat, Buried Alive

Erotic play discloses a nameless world which is revealed by the nocturnal language of lovers. Such language is not written down. It is whispered into the ear at night in a hoarse voice. At dawn it is forgotten.

— Jean Genet (via aparemfaton)
jahoctopus:

Peter Bruegel  detail 1559

jahoctopus:

Peter Bruegel
detail 1559

antitacta:

Théodule Ribot, untitled.

antitacta:

Théodule Ribot, untitled.

flommus:

El Lissitzky, New Man, Sportsmen, and Gravediggers, from Victory Over the Sun, 1923.

‘In Moscow in 1920-21, El Lissitzky began working on a huge plan for a completely mechanical theatre. It was the most radical attempt to introduce Constructivist ideas into staging. In [a text] originally published as the foreword to his album of ten color lithographs issued in 1923, Lissitzky explained how this “electro-mechanical spectacle” was supposed to work. His conception reveals an excessively romantic attitude toward the machine. The engineer controls the whole set, which seemingly represents the universe; thanks to the machine, man can now take the place of God. Instead of actors, there are mechanically controlled figures.

‘It is significant that Lissitzky should have chosen as the demonstration of his mechanized stage a play by Alexei Kruchenikh, which had been presented in St. Petersburg in 1913 with a famous decor by Malevich. It was not particularly well suited to the new stage, but what probably impressed Lissitzky was the idea of man’s ability to dominate the sun by his technical mastery. This view of the development of the technolocal age was to reach its culmination (and hopefully its terminus) with the dropping of the atomic bomb.’

(From catalog text for the exhibition, The Machine: As Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age, curated K. G. Pontus Hultén at the Museum of Modern Art, 1968)

derrierelasalledebains:

Buk bukowski

blushingcheekymonkey:

rollin crampton- art international cover (march, 1964)

blushingcheekymonkey:

rollin crampton- art international cover (march, 1964)